Ribbesford Lodge

Ribbesford Lodge was Consecrated in 1960 under Charter from The United Grand Lodge of England. Originally the Founders looked to base the Lodge in Bewdley but no suitable premises were available and so the decision was made to use the existing premises in Stourport instead and, as Ribbesford is halfway between Bewdley and Stourport, they decided to call it the Ribbesford Lodge.The design of our Lodge Banner and the symbol which appears on our stationary, is taken from the early Norman doorway which forms the north entrance to Ribbesford Church.

The earliest written record is contained in an Anglo-Saxon charter belonging to Lord Somers, and printed at the end of Heming’s Chartal, Eccles, Wigon (page 598). It is entitled “Contract to Wulfstan, Archbishop of York and also Bishop of Worcester, to give Ribbesford (sic) to his Sister for her lifetime, then to be married to Wulfric.”

The oldest relic of human habitation in this parish is a "celt" of greenish stone found in the bed of the river while digging for gravel. It is of the Neolithic period. One end is fashioned as a maul, the other an axe. It is delineated in ‘Evan’s Flint Implements’ and in ‘Allie’s Antiquities of Worcestershire’.

We read in the Doomesday Book (1085); “King William holds in demesne Childminstre, with sixteen berewicks of hamlets,” and in the list of sixteen names, “Ribeford” is mentioned.

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The design of our Lodge Banner, which appears on the stationary, is taken from the early Norman doorway which forms the north entrance to Ribbesford Church. The well preserved carving over the doorway is emblematic of our Redemption. The soul, personified by a fawn fleeing the pursuits of a monster-evil – when the Archer Knight, the Saviour, intervenes.